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Small Group Discussion Guide

On behalf of the Re•Formation: Always planning team, welcome! As we continue to reflect on the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, we’re asking what it means to be a Lutheran Christian today, and how we live out that Christian identity in our daily lives in the world. The study guides were used at the 2017 Synod Assembly and are available for congregation and ministry use. We encourage you to use, adapt, and share these resources however is helpful for your context. The goal is that you engage in meaningful conversation together as a community. 

Re·Formation Always Leader Guides
Session 1
Session 2

Re·Formation Always Participant Guides
Session 1
Session 2

Caring for Creation
Summary
Full statement
Webpage with study guide

Church in Society
Summary
Full statement
Webpage with study guide

Economic Life
Summary
Full statement
Webpage with study guide

Peace
Summary
Full statement
Webpage with study guide

Race, Ethnicity, and Culture
Summary
Full statement
Webpage with study guide

About ELCA Social Statements

“This church shall develop social statements … that will guide the life of this church as an institution and inform the conscience of its members in the spirit of Christian liberty.” (ELCA social statement, “The Church in Society: A Lutheran Perspective”) 

ELCA social statements are teaching and policy documents that provide broad frameworks to assist us in thinking about and discussing social issues in the context of faith and life. They are meant to help communities and individuals with moral formation, discernment and thoughtful engagement with current social issues as we participate in God’s work in the world. Social statements also set policy for the ELCA and guide its advocacy and work as a publicly engaged church. They result from an extensive process of participation and deliberation and are adopted by a two-thirds vote of an ELCA churchwide assembly. 

The description and procedures for developing and adopting these social teaching and policy documents are established by “Policies and Procedures of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America for Addressing Social Concerns.”